Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.grr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr
Ομοιοπαθητική Θεσσαλονίκη | omoiotherapeia.gr


The first major feature of my Homeopathic Treatment is the Indivualization for Treatment Determination.This means that different people may have different pathogenic reasons,symptoms and syndromes even though the disease name is the same, so treatment strategies and formulas are different. So different treatment strategies will be used according to the different causative factors.

The other major principle is Totality for Treatment Determination.This means that in all Diseases the whole organism suffers,even if organ pathology is conventionally recognized in a certain organ or part of the body.So,treatment should be applied for both the diseased organ or part of the body and for the totality of all current sufferings all over the body.


Modern Homeopathy should care equally

for both the Patient and the Disease.


Your First Appointment

Just after the booking of the Appointment and  before the Consultation,you are provided  via email with a printed Questionnaire,which must be completed.  It asks for:

    •Basic  contact details, including address, phone and mobile numbers, email address

    •A brief description  of  your current health problems

    •A brief reference to your past medical history

Try to complete the questionnaire well in advance of your appointment and bring to me at your consultation appointment



The consultations take place in a comfortable, relaxed and friendly environment. The first time you come along for a consultation, I spend at least an hour talking through the specific symptoms,health conditions and/or disease(s) you have, obtaining all necessary details of your case history, including any relevant lab tests,medical records,etc that you might already have. During this time you will have a unique opportunity to talk in detail with me about these ailments.Any questions I ask will help me to get a good understanding of your physical and/or emotional problems.


Once Homeopathic treatment has started, follow-up appointments take place once every 4-8 weeks( usually every 6 weeks). During follow up appointments, it is assessed how you are getting on with the homeopathic remedies prescribed, the progress you have made according to homeopathic principles and any indicated extension of the homeopathic case taking is added and included. Further homeopathic medication is prescribed for you based on this evaluation.The whole process is about reviewing , re-formulating and proceeding the planned homeopathic treatment



Health Conditions /





Metastasis or metastatic disease, is the spread of a cancer or other disease from one organ or part of the body to another without being directly connected with it. The new occurrences of disease thus generated are referred to as metastases /mə ˈtæs tə siːz/ (sometimes abbreviated "mets"). Metastasis is a Greek word meaning "displacement", from μετά, meta, "next", and στάσις, stasis, "placement".

Cancer occurs after a single cell in a tissue is progressively genetically damaged to produce cells with uncontrolled proliferation. This uncontrolled proliferation by mitosis produces a primary heterogeneic tumour. The cells which constitute the tumor eventually undergo metaplasia, followed by dysplasia then anaplasia, resulting in a malignant phenotype. This malignancy allows for invasion into the circulation, followed by invasion to a second site for tumorigenesis.

Some cancer cells acquire the ability to penetrate the walls of lymphatic and/or blood vessels, after which they are able to circulate through the bloodstream (circulating tumor cells) to other sites and tissues in the body. This process is known (respectively) as lymphatic or hematogenous spread. After the tumor cells come to rest at another site, they re-penetrate the vessel or walls and continue to multiply, eventually forming another clinically detectable tumor. This new tumor is known as a metastatic (or secondary) tumor. Metastasis is one of the "Hallmarks of Cancer", distinguishing it from benign tumors. Most neoplasms can metastasize, although in varying degrees (e.g., basal cell carcinoma rarely metastasize).

When tumor cells metastasize, the new tumor is called a secondary or metastatic tumor, and its cells are similar to those in the original or primary tumor. This means, for example, that, if breast cancer metastasizes to the lungs, the secondary tumor is made up of abnormal breast cells, not of abnormal lung cells. The tumor in the lung is then called metastatic breast cancer, not lung cancer. Metastasis is a key element in cancer staging systems such as the TNM staging system, where it represents the "M". In Overall Stage Grouping metastasis places a cancer in Stage IV. The possibilities of curative treatment are greatly reduced, or often entirely removed, when a cancer has metastasized.

Initially, nearby lymph nodes are struck early. The lungs, liver, brain, and bones are the most common metastasis locations from solid tumors.

•           In lymph nodes, a common symptom is lymphadenopathy

•           Lungs: cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea (shortness of breath)

•           Liver: hepatomegaly (enlarged liver), nausea] and jaundice

•           Bones: bone pain, fracture of affected bones

•           Brain: neurological symptoms such as headaches, seizures, and vertigo.

Although advanced cancer may cause pain, it is often not the first symptom.

Some patients, however, do not show any symptoms. When the organ gets a metastatic disease it begins to shrink until its lymph nodes burst, or undergo lysis.

Metastasis occurs by following four routes:

1. Transcoelomic

The spread of a malignancy into body cavities can occur via penetrating the surface of the peritoneal, pleural, pericardial, or subarachnoid spaces. For example, ovarian tumors can spread transperitoneally to the surface of the liver.

2. Lymphatic spread

Lymphatic spread allows the transport of tumor cells to lymph nodes and ultimately, to other parts of the body. This is the most common route of metastasis for carcinomas. In contrast, it is uncommon for a sarcoma to metastasize via this route. It is worth noting that the lymphatic system does eventually drain into the systemic venous system via the azygous vein, and therefore these metastatic cells can eventually spread through the haematogenous route.


Lymph node with almost complete replacement by metastatic melanoma. The brown pigment is focal deposition of melanin

3. Hematogenous spread

This is typical route of metastasis for sarcomas, but it is also the favored route for certain types of carcinoma, such as those originating in the kidney (renal cell carcinoma). Because of their thinner walls, veins are more frequently invaded than are arteries, and metastasis tends to follow the pattern of venous flow.

4. Transplantation or implantation

Cancer cells may spread to lymph nodes (regional lymph nodes) near the primary tumor. This is called nodal involvement, positive nodes, or regional disease. ("Positive nodes" is a term that would be used by medical specialists to describe a patient's condition, meaning that the patient's lymph nodes near the primary tumor tested positive for malignancy. It is common medical practice to test by biopsy at least two lymph nodes near a tumor site when doing surgery to examine or remove a tumor.) Localized spread to regional lymph nodes near the primary tumor is not normally counted as metastasis, although this is a sign of worse prognosis. Transport through lymphatics is the most common pathway for the initial dissemination of carcinomas.

There is a propensity for certain tumors to seed in particular organs. This was first discussed as the "seed and soil" theory by Stephen Paget over a century ago, in 1889. The propensity for a metastatic cell to spread to a particular organ is termed 'organotropism'. For example, prostate cancer usually metastasizes to the bones. In a similar manner, colon cancer has a tendency to metastasize to the liver. Stomach cancer often metastasises to the ovary in women, then it is called a Krukenberg tumor.

According to the "seed and soil" theory, it is difficult for cancer cells to survive outside their region of origin, so in order to metastasize they must find a location with similar characteristics. For example, breast tumor cells, which gather calcium ions from breast milk, metastasize to bone tissue, where they can gather calcium ions from bone. Malignant melanoma spreads to the brain, presumably because neural tissue and melanocytes arise from the same cell line in the embryo.

In 1928, James Ewing challenged the "seed and soil" theory and proposed that metastasis occurs purely by anatomic and mechanical routes. This hypothesis has been recently utilized to suggest several hypotheses about the life cycle of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to postulate that the patterns of spread could be better understood through a 'filter and flow' perspective. However, contemporary evidences indicate that the primary tumour may dictate organotropic metastases by inducing the formation of pre-metastatic niches at distant sites, where incoming metastatic cells may engraft and colonise.Specifically, exosome vesicles secreted by tumours have been shown to home to pre-metastatic sites, where they activate pro-metastatic processes such as angiogenesis and modify the immune contexture, so as to foster a favourable microenvironment for secondary tumour growth.

It is theorized that metastasis always coincides with a primary cancer, and, as such, is a tumor that started from a cancer cell or cells in another part of the body. However, over 10% of patients presenting to oncology units will have metastases without a primary tumor found. In these cases, doctors refer to the primary tumor as "unknown" or "occult," and the patient is said to have cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP) or unknown primary tumors (UPT). It is estimated that 3% of all cancers are of unknown primary origin. Studies have shown that, if simple questioning does not reveal the cancer's source (coughing up blood—"probably lung", urinating blood—"probably bladder"), complex imaging will not either. In some of these cases a primary tumor may appear later.

The use of immunohistochemistry has permitted pathologists to give an identity to many of these metastases. However, imaging of the indicated area only occasionally reveals a primary. In rare cases (e.g., of melanoma), no primary tumor is found, even on autopsy. It is therefore thought that some primary tumors can regress completely, but leave their metastases behind.